Laws, Regulations & Annotations

Property Taxes Law Guide – Revision 2011
 

Property Tax Rules

Title 18, Public Revenues California Code of Regulations

DIVISION 1. STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION

CHAPTER 1. STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION—PROPERTY TAX

Subchapter 1. Valuation Principles and Procedures (1–100)

Rule 4

Rule 4. The Comparative Sales Approach to Value.

Reference: Sections 110, 110.1, 110.5, 401, Revenue and Taxation Code. Article XIII A, Sections 1, 2, California Constitution.

When reliable market data are available with respect to a given real property, the preferred method of valuation is by reference to sales prices. In using sales prices of the appraisal subject or of comparable properties to value a property, the assessor shall:

(a) Convert a noncash sale price to its cash equivalent by estimating the value in cash of any tangible or intangible property other than cash which the seller accepted in full or partial payment for the subject property and adding it to the cash portion of the sale price and by deducting from the nominal sale price any amount which the seller paid in lieu of interest to a lender who supplied the grantee with part or all of the purchase money.

(b) When appraising an unencumbered-fee interest, (1) convert the sale price of a property encumbered with a debt to which the property remained subject to its unencumbered-fee price equivalent by adding to the sale price of the seller's equity the price for which it is estimated that such debt could have been sold under value-indicative conditions at the time the sale price was negotiated and (2) convert the sale price of a property encumbered with a lease to which the property remained subject to its unencumbered-fee price equivalent by deducting from the sale price of the seller's equity the amount by which it is estimated that the lease enhanced that price or adding to the price of the seller's equity the amount by which it is estimated that the lease depressed that price.

(c) Convert a sale to the valuation date of the subject property by adjusting it for any change in price level of this type of property that has occurred between the time the sale price was negotiated and the valuation date of the subject property.

(d) Make such allowances as he deems appropriate for differences between a comparable property at the time of sale and the subject property on the valuation date, in physical attributes of the properties, location of the properties, legally enforceable restrictions on the properties' use, and the income and amenities which the properties are expected to produce. When the appraisal subject is land and the comparable property is land of smaller dimensions, and it is assumed that the subject property would be divided into comparable smaller parcels by a purchaser, the assessor shall allow for the cost of subdivision, for the area required for streets and alleys, for selling expenses, for normal profit, and for interest charges during the period over which it is anticipated that the smaller properties will be marketed.

History: Adopted June 21, 1967, effective July 23, 1967.

Amended July 27, 1982, effective December 30, 1982.